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Your Bearfoot Guide to >
Trapper Creek, Alaska



TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Welcome to Trapper Creek
2. A Strong Local Spirit
3. Happy and Free in the Country
4. Mysterious Tropical Foliage... Watch Out!
5. Links for further exploration

1. WELCOME TO TRAPPER CREEK  

A former Gold Rush town, Trapper Creek is a lively homesteading community with a real Alaskan flavor.


+ click on image to enlarge

2. A STRONG LOCAL SPIRIT  

Trapper Creek has a strong local spirit, and celebrates the end of the long winter by holding a "Cabin Fever Reliever" with pie-eating contests, blindfolded snowmobile races, and an award to the most community-spirited local person.

Gold was first reported in this area as early as 1876.

During Gold Rush days, Trapper Creek was a freighting center where horses were kept. The Cache Creek Mining District was 30 miles west of Trapper Creek on the Petersville Road. You can drive up that road to see Mt. McKinley in the Alaska Range.

This is a Trapper Creek pantry.


+ click on image to enlarge

3. HAPPY AND FREE IN THE COUNTRY  

It's a point of pride for many rural Alaskans that they live in a place that is relatively free from government restrictions -- away from a life whose problems (or some of them, at least) are humorously demonstrated by this Trapper Creek yard decoration.

Indeed, many local people moved to Trapper Creek from the "Lower 48" to gain the sense of rediscovered freedom that comes with living in rural Alaska.

Groups of homesteaders arrived from the 1940's to as late as the 1980's. The most well-known group came from Michigan. They arrived in 1959, and were called "The 59ers."


+ click on image to enlarge
4. MYSTERIOUS TROPICAL FOLIAGE . . . WATCH OUT!  

In early summer, this almost tropical-looking plant has green foliage. By August, it's topped with red berries. What is it

For anyone who has attempted to hike in the Alaskan wilderness, the name alone should inspire fear: Devil's Club.

Devil's Club is a bane to hikers, who find themselves grabbing at the plant as they scramble up the slopes, only to come away with a handful of thorns. The floral equivalent of the porcupine, Devil's Club can grow up to 8 feet tall, and in summer, its broad leaves fan outward with deceptive beauty

In winter, after the leaves fall off, all that's left is a thick, devilishly-thorned "club."


+ click on image to enlarge

Trapper Creek: Alaska Community Information Summary
Alaska Department of Community and Economic Development Summary for Trapper Creek. Covers location, climate, history, culture, facilities, and more.


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